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Library News

Faculty Author Series: Maria DePrano


February 6, 2019


Maria DePrano will discuss her book, Art Patronage, Family, and Gender in Renaissance Florence: The Tornabuoni, which presents a comprehensive picture of how one Florentine family commissioned art to gain recognition in their society, revere God, honor family members, especially women, and memorialize deceased loved ones. This book examines the multi-media art patronage of three generations of the Tornabuoni family, who commissioned works from innovative artists, such as Sandro Botticelli and Rosso Fiorentino.

 

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

KL 397

The Public Domain Expands


February 1, 2019


As of January 2019, the public domain in the United States expanded for the first time in 20 years. Since the Sonny Bono Copyright Act of 1998, 1923 had been the cut-off year in which books published in the United States could be assumed to be out of copyright. On this January first, the cut-off year advanced by a year to 1924. Without future copyright law changes, the cut-off year will continue to increase by one every January first until 2073.

Ernest Lowe: Black Migrants to the Central Valley, 1960-1964


January 9, 2019


Immediately following World War II, more than 30,000 Black sharecroppers migrated to California's Central Valley. Coming from places like Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, and Mississippi, these migrants looked to escape the oppression of new-slavery tenant farming and the Jim Crow south. These migrants established their communities in the shadows of the giant farms of the Central Valley, but soon found themselves without work as industrial agriculture took root, and mechanization further decimated the number of available jobs. Some migrants migrated again to the coastal cities in search of new opportunities, but others remained. In the early 1960s, photographer Ernest Lowe visited the Central Valley towns of Pixley and Dos Palos. The photographs showcased in this exhibition are a record of that visit--showcasing communities of single-walled houses with little to no electricity, no roads, no infrastructure. They tell the remarkable story of those who ventured west in search of a dream,...

Workshops for Staff: Leveraging Library Resources


December 18, 2018


Short (25 minutes) workshops are available the week of January 14th for staff. These sessions are intended to increase familiarity with library resources and services for staff’s professional and personal use. Each workshop is offered at least twice. RSVPs are appreciated.

Workshop Offerings:

Elsevier Journal Negotiations: 2/28 Update


December 18, 2018


February 28, 2019: The University of California announced this morning that they are ceasing negotiations with Elsevier. UCOP has published a press release and the Academic Senate has published a letter to faculty discussing its decision.

Visit the Elsevier Journal Negotiations page for more information.

New Platform for Several Gale Databases


November 15, 2018


Several of the UC-licensed Gale databases are now live on the Artemis platform, while others will be transitioned based on Gale’s schedule. The new platform incorporates several new features and tools, such as term frequency (the frequency of search terms within sets of content to identify themes), cross-search capability (ability to search across the content of related products in a single environment) and downloadable OCR (materials are keyword and full-text searchable via optical character recognition).

Abrescy and Kranich Library Award for Student Research Excellence


November 1, 2018


The Carter Joseph Abrescy and Larry Kranich Library Award was established in 2017 to recognize outstanding undergraduate research at UC Merced. The award recognizes students who demonstrate effective use of library and information resources, as well as an understanding of the research process and growth in research practices. A committee of faculty and librarians will review applications and select awardees. A total of $1,000 will be awarded each year; no more than two awards of $500 each will be awarded in a given year.

All student applicants must be currently enrolled as undergraduates at UC Merced and be in good standing with the University (2.0 GPA). Students can submit applications for work produced individually or by a team. Projects or papers may be in another language, but all accompanying materials, including the reflective essay, must be in English. Students applying for the award must contact the...

How to Use the UC Cooperative Extension Archive Collection Guides


October 30, 2018


This month’s blog post is the second video in our series on how to use and search UC Cooperative Extension Archival materials online. This video walks you through using Collection Guides on the Online Archive of California, OAC. Next month’s video will be on locating digitized content in Calisphere.

 

 

New via Request: Request a Book Chapter


October 29, 2018


The CDL Resource Sharing Team and ILL Operations Advisory Group have announced a new feature available via Request: request just a book chapter. Patrons no longer need to re-input the bibliographic information into a Citation Linker form in order to only request a book chapter via interlibrary loan.

Open Access Week 2018


October 22, 2018


What is Open Access?

Open Access is a growing international movement that uses the Internet to throw open the locked doors that once hid knowledge.

Open Access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. What makes it possible is the internet and the consent of the author or copyright-holder. OA is entirely compatible with peer review, and all the major OA initiatives for scientific and scholarly literature insist on its importance. Just as authors of journal articles donate their labor, so do most journal editors and referees participating in peer review.

OA literature is not free to produce, even if it is less expensive to produce than conventionally published literature. The question is not whether scholarly literature can be made costless, but whether there are better ways to pay the bills than by charging readers and creating access barriers. Business models for paying the bills depend on how...

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